We are currently researching into

Disability

Disability is an umbrella term for many conditions that might impair a childs ability to perform an activity in a manner or range considered normal for a human being of that developmental stage.

In Progress Research

Re-vascularisation of the femoral head in the initial phase of Perthes disease

Dr David Kieser University of Otago, Christchurch What is the problem and who does it affect? An estimated 50 children each year in New Zealand are affected by the life-changing bone disorder, Perthes disease. It occurs as a result of avascular necrosis on the upper thigh bone – known as the femoral head –  which essentially means there is insufficient…

Improving the eyesight of children using a tablet computer

Professor Steven Dakin University of Auckland What is the problem and who does it affect? Amblyopia, colloquially referred to as ‘lazy eye’, is a developmental disorder characterised by reduced vision in one eye. It is the most common cause of visual impairment in childhood, affecting one in 30 children. Long-term functional consequences of amblyopia are poor acuity (sharpness of sight)…

Using robots to increase the mobility of children with cerebral palsy

Dr Andrew McDaid University of Auckland What is the problem and who does it affect? Cerebral palsy (CP) describes a group of developmental disorders of movement and posture that are caused by disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain. CP is the most common cause of childhood disability and is associated with over-tight muscles (spasticity) that can…

Human gall balder epithelium treatment of haemophilia

Emeritus Professor Bob Elliott University of Auckland What is the problem? Haemophilia A (HA) is an inherited blood clotting disorder, which mostly affects boys due to its mode of inheritance. Blood-clotting is the body’s response to the breaking of a blood vessel. It helps prevent excessive bleeding by way of platelets – types of blood cells in your blood –…



Recently Completed Research

Engineering full thickness human skin for the treatment of burn injury

Professor Rod Dunbar University of Auckland What is the problem and who is affected? Burn injury is a leading cause of injury to children in New Zealand. Every year in New Zealand, approximately 475 children under 15 years are admitted to hospital as a result of burns or scalds; 80% of these are five years or under. Maori are over-represented…

Detecting amblyopia more accurately using tablet-based technology

Professor Steven Dakin University of Auckland What is amblyopia? Amblyopia is a visual condition where a difference in a child’s eyes causes the brain to ‘ignore’ one eye, which eventually leads to very poor vision in that eye. An estimated 20,000 children live with this condition in New Zealand, which can greatly reduce their quality of life. Conventional treatment consists…