We are currently researching into

Infant Mortality

New Zealand experiences a dramatically high number of sudden unexpected deaths in infancy (SUDI) when compared comparably wealthy countries, with vast ethnic disparities.

Funding Amount:

$275,500.00

In Progress Research

Using ‘big data’ to identify new risk factors for Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy

Professor Ed Mitchell University of Auckland What is the problem and who does it affect?  Rates of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) – previously known as SIDS or cot death – have fallen significantly since the late 1980s. A large share of this reduction is due to the “Back to Sleep” campaign, and the research informing it, which advised…

An individual participant data meta-analysis of going-to-sleep position and risk of late pregnancy stillbirth

Professor Lesley McCowan University of Auckland  What is the problem and who does it affect? Late stillbirth – the loss of a baby in the womb after 28 weeks of pregnancy – still affects around 1000 babies and families in New Zealand and Australia each year. The long-term effects of such a shock on a family can be devastating, heightened by…

Cot death brochure

Cure Kids Despite great advances in the understanding of predisposing causes around sudden and unexpected death in infancy (SUDI), New Zealand rates remain stubbornly high when compared to other developed nations. Many leading experts in this field believe we have elucidated a number of risk factors through robust research that, if implemented correctly, could cause a precipitative drop in SUDI…

Implementing a Safe Sleep Calculator into Primary Care to identify and address risk in infants more vulnerable to SUDI

Professor Ed Mitchell University of Auckland What is the problem and who does it affect? A pioneering study into sudden unexpected death infancy (SUDI), by Prof Ed Mitchell, in the late 1980s, achieved great success, saving an estimated 3,000 babies in the time since it was implemented. However, we still lose around 50 babies to SUDI each year. Families from…



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