We are currently researching into

Preterm

Each year in New Zealand, approximately 700 babies are born very preterm, exposing them to a higher risk of a number of neuro developmental problems, including cerebral palsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We also experience a dramatically high number of stillborn babies.

Funding Amount:

$880,475.00

In Progress Research

Does early nutrition in extremely preterm babies improve neurodevelopmental outcomes in early childhood?

Professor Frank Bloomfield and Ms Barbara Cormack University of Auckland  What is the problem and who does it affect? Roughly 5000 babies are born preterm (before 37 weeks’ gestation) each year in New Zealand. Where once their likelihood of survival was low, due to advances in medical care in recent years, many of these extremely premature babies are surviving. One…

Intranasal Immunomodulatory for Preterm Brain Injury

Associate Professor Mhoyra Fraser University of Auckland What is the problem and who does it affect? Each year in New Zealand around 500 babies are born preterm. The earlier a baby is born, the greater the risk he or she has of developing brain injury. Around half of the very preterm babies will have neurological and cognitive deficits that affect…

An investigation into the long-term effects associated with being born very preterm

Professor Brian Darlow University of Otago, Christchurch What is the problem and who does it affect? Infants born very low birth weight or very preterm account for about two per cent of births, however, the medical resources expended on them are vastly disproportionate to their prevalence. Medical advances have meant that more and more of these babies are surviving, however…

PROVIDE: a randomised controlled trial of increased protein intake in extremely low birth weight babies (ELBW) in the first week of life to improve neurodevelopmental outcome

Professor Frank Bloomfield University of Auckland What is the problem and who does it affect? Fetal growth between 23 and 27 weeks is more rapid than at any other stage of human growth. This is also the same period of development during which extremely low birth-weight babies (ELBW; birth-weight < 1,000g) are born. It is estimated that 250 babies are…

A computer model to adjust the insulin dose in preterm babies with high blood sugar levels

Dr Jane Alsweiler University of Auckland What is the problem and who does it affect? It’s estimated 780 babies are born very pre-term, less than 32 weeks’ gestation, each year in New Zealand. Extremely pre-term babies commonly develop high blood sugar levels (hyperglycaemia) in the neonatal period, which is often associated with brain injury. Hyperglycaemia is usually treated with insulin,…

Promoting Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Maturation as a Treatment for Preterm Brain Injury

Dr Justin Dean University of Auckland What is the problem and who does it affect? Approximately 500 babies are born very prematurely each year in New Zealand. While the rate of survival of these babies has greatly increased due to advances in perinatal care, the fact is, they are at high risk of developing long-term problems, including neurological disorders. For…



Recently Completed Research

Are babies treated with dextrose gel, a measure for reducing low blood sugar in babies, symptom-free at two years of age?

Professor Jane Harding University of Auckland What is the problem and how does it affect babies? Hypoglycaemia, which means a low blood sugar concentration, is the only readily preventable cause of brain damage in newborn babies. Up to 15% of newborn babies will have low blood sugar concentrations. However, this number is higher when the mother has diabetes (50%) or…