Professor Mauro Farella

Professor Farella's research interests include orthodontics, craniofacial growth and jaw/chewing function.

Professor Mauro Farella was born in Naples and moved to NZ with his family in 2009, attracted by the high-quality, research-intensive academic environment. His overall research interests include orthodontics, craniofacial growth and jaw/chewing function, with expertise in the pathophysiology of masticatory muscles, bruxism, and temporomandibular joints.

His research includes randomised clinical trials, clinical evaluation of patient-centred interventions, and translational research using animal models, as well as investigating gene-environment interactions as possible causes of craniofacial and dental anomalies.

Professor Farella and his team are contributing to the establishment of a biobank of DNA samples at the Faculty of Dentistry from patients with different craniofacial conditions. He has a special interest in the development of wearable devices for the diagnosis and long-term monitoring of bruxism, orofacial pain, sleep disordered breathing, and eating disorders.

Professor Farella is deputy director of the Sir John Walsh Research Institute, where he is also the director of Craniofacial Research. He is also a member of the management committee for the New Zealand Center of Research Excellence on Medical Technologies (MedTech CoRE).



Research Projects



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